Intermittent Fasting: Why Women Should Fast Differently than Men

Ketogenic weight loss

Click Here to Subscribe: http://Bit.ly/ThomasVid
Website: http://ThomasDeLauer.com

Intermittent Fasting: Why Women Should Fast Differently than Men – Thomas DeLauer

Everywhere you look on the internet, you're going to have someone telling you that fasting is terrible for women. They're going to tell you that your thyroid is going to be destroyed. They're going to tell you that your hormones are going to be completely out of whack, and that you're never going to recover.

Well, it's not quite the truth. In this video, I want to give you the A to Z breakdown of what happens to the female body during a fast, during intermittent fasting in particular. How often should a women fast? What can they expect? What's happening with their hormones and what's happening with their reproductive system? In this video, I'm going to take you through A to Z what goes on, starting with the starvation and the hunger hormones, leading into your reproductive hormones, then leading into your thyroid. Let's dive right in, and men, this video's for you, too, because it's going to help describe exactly what's going on in your body, as well.

Okay, here's the thing. When it comes down to starvation hormones … we're talking leptin, ghrelin, insulin, things like that that we have to be paying attention to when it comes down to hunger and satiation … women are much more sensitive to them. It's nothing bad, nothing wrong with them. It's simply a protective mechanism. It's not the fact that the thyroid's shutting down. It's the fact that the female body is recognizing that there's no food coming in, so they don't want to be producing eggs. They don't want to be ovulating. It's natural. Why would a female body want to produce eggs to stimulate potential reproduction if they're not eating, if they're starving?

That's where this whole thing starts. It all has to do with leptin, ghrelin, and insulin. But it goes much more than that. We're going to talk about what's happening with the brain and with the gonads now.

Let's talk about GNRH. GNRH is a particular thing that is secreted by the hypothalamus in both males and females, and it has to do with what's called the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. I know lots of guys that are proud of the HPTA, thinking that it only has to do with testosterone and their male bodies. Oh, no. That's not the case. The HPTA axis, that entire process, is men and women. And here's how it works.

Your brain has an area called the hypothalamus. This hypothalamus ends up secreting something known as GNRH. This GNRH tells the pituitary gland to produce luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone. What these hormones end up doing is triggering the production of sperm and testosterone in men and producing ovulation and triggering progesterone and estrogen in women. They both do the same thing, just with a different end result. We still have the same catalyst, the same hormones.

Now what ends up happening is how women go through this process compared to men. Now that we know GNRH and we understand the HPTA has to do with men and women, we can talk about the precursor to the GNRH, which is where the problem really starts, and that's something known as kisspeptin. Where the problem occurs with kisspeptin is just with people not knowing what's really going on. Most of the beef in the fasting community and most of the beef with women fasting in general all has to do with kisspeptin.
.

References

1) Intermittent Fasting For Women, What You Need To Know To Avoid Hormonal Imbalance. (2017, May 17). Retrieved from http://www.collective-evolution.com/2017/05/17/intermittent-fasting-for-women-what-you-need-to-know-to-avoid-hormonal-imbalance/
2) Intermittent Fasting for women: Important information you need to know. (2015, March 25). Retrieved from https://www.precisionnutrition.com/intermittent-fasting-women
3) Intermittent Fasting Dietary Restriction Regimen Negatively Influences Reproduction in Young Rats: A Study of Hypothalamo-Hypophysial-Gonadal Axis. (2013, January 29). Retrieved from http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0052416
4) Trepanowski JF , et al. (n.d.). Effect of Alternate-Day Fasting on Weight Loss, Weight Maintenance, and Cardioprotection Among Metabolically Healthy Obese Adults: A Randomized Cli… – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28459931
5) Heilbronn LK , et al. (n.d.). Glucose tolerance and skeletal muscle gene expression in response to alternate day fasting. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15833943
6) Fasting and Thyroid. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.drsarasolomon.com/fasting-and-thyroid/